Resources

These are some websites, books, videos and more that you may find helpful, as well as links to some of the photographers whose work is on these website pages.

Feeling in need of inspiration?

Zen Moments is a lovely website that has lots of moving, heart touching and uplifting stories, pictures, music and much more about the amazing power of the ordinary, the small and the seemingly insignificant in all aspects of human and natural life.

Self-Compassion

Center for Mindful Compassion has lots of resources to support you during these difficult times.

Mindful Self-Compassion was developed by Clinical psychologist and Buddhist Dr Chris Germer.
See www.chrisgermer.com for more helpful resources.

And fellow Buddhist and Psychology professor Kristin Neff.
Kristin learnt much about self-compassion from her own life when her son was born with autism. She has a self-help book, Self Compassion. And if you like questionnaires, she has a good self-compassion test on her website and various useful exercises.
self-compassion.org

Compassion focused therapy was developed by Professor Paul Gilbert and a number of other clinical psychologists from their work with people seeking help in the NHS. On their website you can find books, exercises, audios and videos that you might find helpful.
compassionatemind.co.uk

Trauma

Trauma Release Exercises are a non-verbal and body based way of both dealing with stress and trauma and preventing it.
It helps us to reclaim the natural ‘shake it off’ mechanism we see in mammals.
www.traumaprevention.com

Also see the related pioneering work on the somatic and relational reality of trauma by Peter Levine, such as his book Waking the Tiger.  It is not all in your mind!

Highly Sensitive?

Clinical psychologist Dr Elaine Aron is highly sensitive and has spent decades researching sensitivity and finding ways to help herself and others with this gift and its shadow curse of overwhelm, burn out and relationship difficulties.

About 15-20% of us have sensory processing sensitivity. This is not a disease, just a difference among people, even most animals, like gender. Dr Aron explains it as the difference in the degree and quality of “our awareness of subtleties in stimuli”.  Its about our brains and nervous systems processing sensations and other information in a slightly different way, including a tendency to pause and check, do plenty of research, before taking action.

These are great skills and qualities to have and people with sensory processing sensitivity can be great with people, are often very creative, artists, deep thinkers, advisors and much more, but that sensitivity can be overwhelming in our multi-media, 24/7, non-stop pace of life which is geared up to the other 80% of people.

You can find all sorts of information and resources on her site.
hsperson.com


Photography credits

Barn Owl feather by Melanie Lindenthal – by kind permission.

Creative Commons images
Reproduced with gratitude. Please click the links to find out more.

Greeting the sun by Jan Kaluza

Cayman sunset by goatling

Cherry blossom by Pixella

Cowslips by PhotoMIX

Fresco showing a woman so-called Sappho holding writing implements, from Pompeii, Naples National Archaeological Museum